NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program offers awards to Caroline Larkin, April Rich and Gaby Gerlach

The 2021 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) has offered awards to Caroline Larkin (Faeder/Shoemaker Labs) and April Rich (Carvunis Lab), while Gaby Gerlach (Camacho Lab) has received an honorable mention. Congratulations!

Caroline Larkin April Rich Gaby Gerlach

About the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program: The purpose of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) is to help ensure the quality, vitality, and diversity of the scientific and engineering workforce of the United States. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing full-time research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) or in STEM education.

Samantha Furman awarded NIH NCI fellowship

Samantha Furman awarded NIH NCI F31 Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral National Research Service Award to support her PhD work titled “Quantifying heterocellular communication and spatial intratumoral heterogeneity from high dimensional spatial proteomics data”

Tumors are dynamic ecosystems comprising spatially heterogeneous microdomains. Microdomain-specific signaling networks reciprocally support a phenotypic continuum with complex intermediary cell types and cell states shaping the tumor microenvironment. The recent explosion of next-generation, high-content, high-throughput spatial imaging technologies for intact tissues measuring protein expressions, DNA and RNA probes has provided an opportunity to harness spatial data for inferring tumor biology. The overarching goal of this proposed computational and systems pathology project is to identify the emergent pathogenic cellular and molecular network transitions within an evolving tumor microenvironment from hyperplexed spatial image datasets associated with disease progression through cellular phenotyping, microdomain extraction, and spatial network biology inference algorithms. In combination, these methods have the potential to provide insights into pathophysiological mechanisms, identify novel drug targets and inform therapeutic strategies for individual patients.
Samantha Furman is a 4th year PhD student in Dr. S. Chakra Chennubhotla’s lab in the Computational and Systems Biology Department. With this fellowship support, Samantha will continue her training towards a PhD in Computational Biology from the University of Pittsburgh.

Anne-Ruxandra Carvunis selected as a 2021 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow

Congratulations to Anne-Ruxandra Carvunis on being selected as a 2021 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow for her work in Computational & Evolutionary Molecular Biology! This fellowship is awarded to early-career researchers whose “achievements and potential place them among the next generation of scientific leaders.”

For more information, please click here to see the official announcement.

DCSB Welcomes Yu-Chih Chen to the faculty

It is with great pleasure that we welcome Dr. Yu-Chih Chen to our Department as an Assistant Professor in the tenure stream effective November 2020.

Dr. Chen joins us from the labs of Dr. Max S. Wicha and Dr. Euisik Yoon in the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and the Forbes Institute for Cancer Discovery at the University of Michigan. He obtained his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the lab of Dr. Yoon at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Chen’s research focuses on multi-dimensional single-cell analysis augmented with machine learning for cancer precision medicine. The integrated approach will change how we understand and treat cancer and ultimately improve outcomes for patients

We are delighted to welcome Yu-Chih to our academic family, both at the University of Pittsburgh and the UPMC Hillman Cancer Center as well as the Training Faculty at the Carnegie Mellon University/University of Pittsburgh Joint PhD Program in Computational Biology, CPCB.

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Yu-Chih Chen and his family to the Pittsburgh community!

DCSB Welcomes Dr. Nathan Lord to our academic family!

It is with great pleasure that we welcome Dr. Nathan Lord to our Department as an Assistant Professor in the tenure stream effective September 2020.

Dr. Lord joins us from the lab of Dr. Alex Schier in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University, where he was an Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow. He obtained his PhD in the lab of Dr. Johan Paulsson, Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, and his B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Michigan State University.

Dr. Lord’s research focuses on how cells and embryos behave reliably in the face of stochastic fluctuations and uncertain environmental conditions. His long-term research goal is to understand how embryos prevent and correct errors during development.

We are delighted to welcome Nate to our academic family as well as the Training Faculty at the Carnegie Mellon University/University of Pittsburgh Joint PhD Program in Computational Biology, CPCB.

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Nathan Lord and his wife, Ms. Glynis A. Ritchie, to the Pittsburgh community!