Dr. Robin Lee Lab publish in Cell Systems

Lee Lab publish in Cell Systems

 

Cell Systems

NF-ūĚõčB Dynamics Discriminate between TNF Doses in Single Cells

Zhang Q1, Gupta S1, Schipper DL, Kowalczyk GJ, Mancini AE, Faeder JR, Lee REC*

Using an information theory framework and single-cell data, Zhang et al. set out to distinguish between different mechanisms for activation of intracellular signals. They show that heterogeneity between cellular states can lead to underestimates in the capabilities of single cells. In contrast with a switch-like model for pathway activation, they find that single cells can encode multiple levels of response that increase with stimulation strength.

Please click here to view the full article

The Clark and Morehouse Lab research is featured in PNAS and the Atlantic

The group discovered surprising abilities in a seemingly common butterfly, the cabbage whites – their reproductive capabilities are extraordinarily complex and powerful.

Quick highlights about the butterflies from the text:

  • Males create spermatophores that are 13% of their body weight, which¬†he¬†builds inside of¬†the female.
  • Females have reproductive tracts that are more efficiently stomach-like than their own stomachs (including¬†a chewing jaw¬†that helps them break down the nutrients in the spermatophores).
  • Their relationship is a¬†rapidly evolving¬†battle of the sexes.

The¬†article¬†is¬†an¬†interesting¬†read¬†about¬†a¬†seemingly¬†plain¬†jane¬†butterfly. You¬†can¬†read¬†more¬†in¬†the¬†Atlantic:¬†“This¬†Common¬†Butterfly¬†Has¬†an¬†Extraordinary¬†Sex¬†Life”¬†by¬†Ed¬†Yong. The¬†research¬†can¬†be¬†found¬†in¬†PNAS.

Camille Meslin, Tamara S. Cherwin, Melissa S. Plakkec, Brandon S. Small, Breanna J. Goetz, Nathan I. Morehouse, and Nathan L. Clark (2017) Structural complexity and molecular heterogeneity of a butterfly ejaculate reflect a complex history of selection PNAS doi: 10.1073/pnas.1707680114.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/06/butterfly-cabbage-white-vagina-dentata/530889/

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20170628/UC-biologist-explores-structural-complexities-of-butterflies-to-unlock-mysteries-of-human-infertility.aspx

CSB – Immuno Joint Departmental Retreat

The Department of Computational and Systems Biology and Department of Immunology hosted a joint retreat on June 7, 2017 at The Twentieth Century Club in Pittsburgh, PA.

Speakers included:

  • Keynote – Dr. Steve Kleinstein (Yale)
  • Anne-Ruxandra Carvunis (CSB)
  • Bill Hawse (Immuno)
  • Takis Benos (CSB)
  • Lisa Borghesi (Immuno)
  • Carlos Camacho (CSB)
  • Florian Weisel (Immuno)
  • Chakra Chennubhotla (CSB)
  • Sandra Cascio (Immuno)
  • Jim Faeder (CSB)
  • Dario Vignali (Immuno)

A poster session followed – congratulations to our winners!
GRADUATE STUDENTS:
1st place: Abigail Overacre-Delgoffe (Immuno)
2nd place: Marta Wells (CSB)
3rd place: Jingyu Zhang (CSB)

POSTDOCS and RESEARCH ASSOCIATES:
1st place: Deepali Sawant (Immuno)
2nd place: Jason Lohmueller (Immuno)
3rd place: Justin Spiriti (CSB)

Later in the evening, the Department of Computational and Systems Biology had a reception with awards at the Carnegie Science Center.

Congratulations to Wynn Meyer (best postdoc), She Zhang (best student), and Marcia Schwab (best staff) on their awards.

More info here: http://csb.pitt.edu/retreat/

Photos: http://www.csb.pitt.edu/csb-retreat-2017/

CSB Members Attend March for Science

Pitt’s Computational and Systems Biology showed up to the March for Science in style – both in Pittsburgh and DC!
There was a demonstration in Oakland from 12 PM ‚Äď 2 PM, beginning on Bigelow Blvd between Forbes and Fifth Aves. There were several speakers both before and after the march around Oakland.

One of the speakers was adjunct faculty member, Lance Davidson, and he talked about how science is part of Pittsburgh’s core.