Dr. Xing (PI) and Dr. Simon Watkins (co-I) receive R01 award from NIDDK

Dr. Xing (PI) and Dr. Simon Watkins (co-I) received a R01 award from NIDDK titled Role of the Snail1-Twist-p21 axis on cell cycle arrest and renal fibrosis development.


Kidney fibrosis is slowly-developing, largely irreversible process that accompanies all chronic kidney diseases. The team will use mathematical modeling and quantitative imaging approaches to study how the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell cycle program are coupled in kidney epithelial cells that lead to cell cycle arrest under acute kidney injury and subsequent fibrosis development.

Dr. Jianhua Xing Dr. Simon Watkins

Congratulations to Nick Pabon, PhD, for his first author paper in PlosCompBio

Dr. Nick Pabon publishes first author paper in PlosCompBio titled: “Predicting protein targets for drug-like compounds using transcriptomics” with Profs. Carlos J. Camacho and Ziv Bar-Joseph.

The paper describes the first method capable of predicting novel drug-target interactions using gene expression profiles. Nick contribution was specially notable in highlighting correlations between profiles indirectly related to the target as the main determinant of physical interactions in the machine learning model.

Read the full paper here

Pittsburgh Chromatin Club Mini-Symposium: 12/14

Friday December 14, 2018  1:00 – 5:00 PM UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, Cooper Classroom B/C

5115 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh

 

1:00   Roni Lahr, Berman Lab, University of Pittsburgh School of Art & Sciences “The mTORC1-LARP1 axis in gene expression: Elucidating the molecular mechanism of La-related protein 1 in TOP translation.”

1:30   Miguel Brieno-Enriquez, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

“TERRA transcription and interacting proteins during PGC development”

2:00    Yi Shi, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

“Integrative proteomics to producing a large versatile repertoire of therapeutic nanobodies”

2:30    Refreshment Break

3:00    Joel McManus, Carnegie Mellon University “Finding and Testing Hidden uORFs”

3:30    Robin Lee, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

“Taking advantage of cell-to-cell variability to learn how cells process information.”

4:00   Jacob Stewart-Ornstein, Department of Computational and Systems Biology Research, Genome Stability Program, UPMC-Hillman Cancer Center

“Transcriptional linearity and dynamic feedback are hallmarks of stress responses from budding yeast to cancer.

 

 

 

 

 

Funding generously provided by the University of Pittsburgh, the Genome Stability Program at UPMC-Hillman Cancer Center, and the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Department, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Organizers: Karen Arndt, Sanford Leuba, Ben Van Houten, and Andy VanDemark

Dr. Jingyu Zhang from Xing’s lab presented at Multiscale Cell Fate Symposium at UC Irvine

Dr. Jingyu Zhang from Xing’s lab presented at Multiscale Cell Fate Symposium at UC Irvine. The NSF-Simons Center for Mulitscale Cell Fate Research (CMCF) held their 2018 Inaugural Symposium on October 1-2, 2018. The Symposium focused on emergent properties of cell fate, and provided several opportunities for initiating collaborations between young researchers across disciplines, including a competition of Interdisciplinary Opportunity Award for supporting collaborative projects.